Good good news

Too often, we fail to give the Lord credit for the various blessings He has bestowed upon our lives.  In fact, often we fail to even recognize the hand of God moving in our lives.  We brush it aside and call it everyday occurances.  However, if we were to step back and pay close attention, then we would see God in the little things, in bigger areas, and areas that would require the miraculous.

In my own life, we received some disturbing news.  My father had a spot on one of his lungs.  From the onset, everyone from family to doctors assumed it was cancerous.  The x-rays and CT scans just highlighted the anomaly on my dad’s lung.  The biopsy, however, came back negative.  Whereas one might brush this aside as something less than miraculous, I know that this good news was nothing less than the hand of God moving in my father’s life.

The Jews did not believe that he had been blind and had received his sight, until they called the parents of the man who had received his sight  and asked them, “Is this your son, who you say was born blind? How then does he now see?”  His parents answered, “We know that this is our son and that he was born blind.  But how he now sees we do not know, nor do we know who opened his eyes. Ask him; he is of age. He will speak for himself.”  (His parents said these things because they feared the Jews, for the Jews had already agreed that if anyone should confess Jesus to be Christ, he was to be put out of the synagogue.)  Therefore his parents said, “He is of age; ask him.”  So for the second time they called the man who had been blind and said to him, “Give glory to God. We know that this man is a sinner.”  He answered, “Whether he is a sinner I do not know. One thing I do know, that though I was blind, now I see.”  They said to him, “What did he do to you? How did he open your eyes?”  He answered them, “I have told you already, and you would not listen. Why do you want to hear it again? Do you also want to become his disciples?”  And they reviled him, saying, “You are his disciple, but we are disciples of Moses.  We know that God has spoken to Moses, but as for this man, we do not know where he comes from.”  The man answered, “Why, this is an amazing thing! You do not know where he comes from, and yet he opened my eyes.  We know that God does not listen to sinners, but if anyone is a worshiper of God and does his will, God listens to him.  Never since the world began has it been heard that anyone opened the eyes of a man born blind.  If this man were not from God, he could do nothing.”  They answered him, “You were born in utter sin, and would you teach us?” And they cast him out.   (John 9:18-34)

Even when Jesus walked upon the earth, people failed to see His miraculous works for what they were. God was moving in their midst and they simply brushed Him aside.  Man has been brushing the hand of God aside ever since.  When confronted with the miraculous, man still refuses to believe it is anything out of the ordinary.

The question we need to ask ourselves is, “In which category do we fall: the naysayers or those that believe?”  I know beyond a shadow of doubt that the spot on my dad’s lung was cancerous, but our God did the miraculous and touched his lungs with His hand.  My God is bigger than cancer.  My God is still a healer.

Bigger than all my problems; bigger than all my fears; God is bigger than any mountain that I can or cannot see.  Bigger than all my questions; bigger than anything; God is bigger than any mountain that I can or cannot  see. (Gordon Jenson; Bigger than any Mountain)

Believing God–James

from Valley to Valley

I had a teacher in high school who told of a history final he had in college and his answer.  All he had to do was to tell the history of man.  His answer was one line: war with brief periods of peace.  Over the years I have pondered his answer and have come to the conclusion that he was probably right.  Humanity’s history is that of warfare.  Nation against nation, neighbor against neighbor, and brother against brother has been the par for the course since Cain slew Abel.

Whereas the history of humanity can be defined as warfare, the history of man, any given man, could be defined as a struggle.  We have often heard it said, “If it’s not one thing, then it’s another,” or “If just can’t catch a break.”  This too is par for the course in the life of every man.  In church circles, we call these trying life experiences as trials or valleys. I have determined that we travel through life from valley to valley with be if mountaintop experiences.  

My brethren, count it all joy when you fall into various trials, knowing that the testing of your faith produces patience. But let patience have its perfect work, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking nothing. (James 1:2-5)

Our lives are defined by these valley experiences.  Some people are resentful of the trials they go through, and therefore they become bitter in life.  Others seem unfazed by whatever life throws their way.  Regardless of how one handles these unexpected two steps in life’s road, we all still experience the same kinds of life trying moments.  We all experience life in some type of valley.

Our faith plays predominant role in how we deal with these trials life hurls our way. We can either find strength in Christ and draw closer to Him through during trying times, or we can be like the seed in the parable of the sower that fell amongst the stoney places. “As for what was sown on rocky ground, this is the one who hears the word and immediately receives it with joy,  yet he has no root in himself, but endures for a while, and when tribulation or persecution arises on account of the word, immediately he falls away.” (Matthew 13:20-21)  

We live in a state of constant struggle with brief intermittent periods of rest: trial to trial, from valley to valley.  It is a constant in life, and something we can’t change.  We must endure it.  I have found that I can only endure it with the Eternal One who has already seen my trials from beginning to end, and He will lead me safely through them.

Trusting in Christ–James

I Can’t Believe My Eyes

Recently, we as a nation endured the heartwrenching tragedy of an immoral man fueled by hate target and assassinate five Dallas police officers because of both their race and profession.  I could hardly believe my eyes when rather than calling the shooter’s actions evil, he was hailed by some as a martyr.  My first thought was, “What is this world coming to?”  To answer my rhetorical question, this world is coming to its end.

But understand this, that in the last days there will come times of difficulty. For people will be lovers of self, lovers of money, proud, arrogant, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, heartless, unappeasable, slanderous, without self-control, brutal, not loving good, treacherous, reckless, swollen with conceit, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, having the appearance of godliness, but denying its power. Avoid such people. (2 Timothy 3:1-5)

There is no possible way we can stop that which the Lord has preordained.  Those individuals who stand on the street corner with their signs proclaiming the end of the world is near are not too far off with their message. Where they are error is by proclaiming a date and at times the method of the world’s doom.  This world’s fate was sealed the instant Adam sinned against God by eating the forbidden fruit.  Therefore, we ought not be shocked when we behold prophecy being fulfilled.

Even though we are experiencing the final moments before Christ’s imminent return, we are stilled called to live holy lives and stand for righteousness.  It is our duty to be “the salt of the earth and light of the world” until Jesus calls us home.  There is no expiration date for salt, and light can’t be eradicated.  So ought be our witness to this lost and dying word.

You are the salt of the earth, but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything except to be thrown out and trampled under people’s feet. You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven. (Matthew 5:13-16)

I am amazed that the Lord has allowed me to live during this world’s waning days.  He must think a lot of us to grant us the privilege of being amongst some of last individuals to proclaim the gospel before His imminent return.  We can’t afford to squander the opportunity we have been given to stand up for Jesus.

Standing for the Faith–James

Back at It

I have been encouraged to begin writing again.  It seems that I took to long of a hiatus from the pen at least that is what I am told.  To be honest, I hadn’t felt like writing or that I had anything relevant to say.  However, I was wrong.  When Jesus is the subject of our speech and writings, It is always relevant.  As the apostle Paul told the men of Athens,”In him we live and move and have our being.” (Acts 17:28)

Recently, a friend of mine lost his wife of 47 years. When I enquired to how he was doing, he said, “This I do know, I am going to dedicate the rest of my life to Jesus, telling all of His love to take my wife to heaven to stop her pain.”  Whereas many people see death as a negative, Ric saw it for what it was in Wendy’s case: an act of love.  That is true faith in Christ being modeled in one’s life for everyone to witness.

We each face adversity in our lives.  However, we must not allow adversity dictate our faith.  Jesus described those who do so in His parable of the sower thus:

As for what was sown on rocky ground, this is the one who hears the word and immediately receives it with joy, yet he has no root in himself, but endures for a while, and when tribulation or persecution arises on account of the word, immediately he falls away. (Matthew 13:20 ESV)

Faith will guide us through the times of adversity.  Scripture proclaims, “If you faint in the day of adversity, your strength is small.” (Proverbs 24:10)

He never promised that the cross would not get heavy and the hill would not be hard to climb.  He never offered victories without fighting, but He said help would always come in time.  Just remember when you’re standing in the valley of decision and the adversary says give in, just hold on, our Lord will show up, and He will take you through the fire again. (Through the Fire; Gerald Crabb)

Walking in the Faith–James

What’s a Pentecostal?

I was raised in a non-denominational chapel that was Southern Baptist in every way possible but name.  For the most part, the chapel staff were all Southern Baptist ministers, at leat while I was in attendance there.  My parents have worked at Cal Farley’s Boys Ranch for the last umpteen years, and although they were and still are Pentecostals, we went to the Boys Ranch chapel instead of driving forty-some odd miles to the nearest Assembly of God church.  My parents never spoke of Pentecostal doctrine to me nor my sister, in fact, I didn’t have a clue that there were such creatures as Pentecostals.  My knowledge of spiritual things came through what I glean in chapel and watching Jimmy Swaggart on television.  Basically, I was a Baptist.

So how did I discovered this peculiar group of Christians known as Pentecostals?  Well first off, I have some memories of attending an Assembly of God church with my parents when we would visit my great-grandparents, but all I can remember is that they had a booster band (that is where the children sing in front of the congregation), someone saying “amen,” and the way Brother Lloyd (mom told me his name) clapped his hands (it was very unique).  My journey to Pentecostalism actually began with my chapel choir director, Joel Popenfoose.  He was Baptist but not Southern Baptist, and that makes a big difference in Texas.

We were on a chapel choir ski trip when Mr. Popenfoose said that he gets the feeling that if you are not Southern Baptist here in Texas, then you are not part of the ‘in-crowd.’  Well, I reasoned within myself that since I have never been part of the so-called ‘in-crowd,’ that I wasn’t going to go to church just to be.  From that moment on, I chose not to be Southern Baptist.  My mom proclaimed that we were Assemblies of God, and therefore I chose to be Assemblies of God, although I had no clue what they believed.  I had never been informed that churches had differing beliefs, therefore, I was in for an eye-opening experience.

What is the relevance to my spiritual journey?  Simply put, many people are in the same boat that I was in.  They have no clue to what Pentecostals believe, and if one looks deep enough, you would find that they have no clue to what their church believes and why.  “Say it isn’t so,” you say, but it is.  Recent surveys show that a majority of Christians here in America do not know what the tenants of their church and faith are.  Recently, I heard some well-known Christian scholars, who happen to be on the radio, proclaim that although they knew what they believed, they were unsure what Pentecostals believe.

The articles that will be posted under the category “Pentecostal Perspective” will deal with what we Pentecostals believe.  Scripture exhorts us to “be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason for the hope that is in you.” (1 Peter 3:15)  The Amplified Bible says “a logical defense” rather than “answer.”  In order for us to obey the Scriptures, we must know what we believe.  If you are not a Pentecostal, that is ok too because the odds are that you will come in contact with or already know one, and these postings will give you insight to what they believe. 

Walking in the love of my Jesus-OTP

Mechanic Jim

I of all people should not, nor can I legitimately, use the title of mechanic.  Whereas my father and grandfather were both mechanics, and my son desires to become one, I am one for whose generation that gene skipped.  I am pretty sure that it is illegal for me to have in my possession a wrench in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and all US territories.  So Mechanic Jim…I think not, in fact as my mother reads this, she is both laughing at the thought and saying “amen” to the “I think not.”  Knowing that I am not a mechanic, nor will I ever be, today found me with socket set in hand and working on my pickup.  Where is a mechanic when you need one???

There are times when I have to do things that I neither like, desire to do, or even remotely qualify to do, at least for a living, but I have to do them.  One thing I hate doing is dishes.  My mother always claimed that was one of her reasons for having kids, so she made me and my sister, whom I would pick a fight with in order to get out of doing dishes, do those rotten dishes.  Today, I have to do dishes.  The same is true spiritually, not the dishes part, I am talking about doing things we don’t want to, like, or are “qualified” to do.  As Christians, we don’t get to pick and choose when God will use us or for what.  Jonah thought he had a choice, and well you know how the story ends. 

Scripture says, “For the gifts and the calling of God are irrevocable.” (Romans 11:29 NKJV)  So when God desires to use us, that calling upon our life for that moment is irrevocable.  To run from it, ignore it, or claim you’re underqualified to fulfill it, is sin.  Who are we to say no to God?  To do so is to elevate yourself to God’s level and to proclaim that you know better than God.  No wonder Jonah was swallowed by a big fish.

In love with my Jesus-OTP

Danger Danger Will Robinson

“Danger, danger Will Robinson!”  Although the tv show from which that now famous phrase was coined was a little before my time, I have seen its reruns numberous times.  Those who know me, know that I am a science fiction fanatic.  From tv show, to movies, to novels, I have indulged myself, some might say escaped, in the realm of fantasy.  Star Wars remains my all-time favorite syfy movie, while my favorite tv series is Star Trek.  Yes, I am a Trekkie, so “live long and prosper.”  Unlike many folks today, however, I do know the difference between fantasy and reality.  These last few days, my life hasn’t even come close to resembling fantasy.

Tuesday morning, I rise early to get my daughter off to school and head to Amarillo.  From there, it takes an unexpected turn.  For the next twenty hours, I am on the road.  To tell the truth, I was glad when that long day came to an end, and that being around three thirty in the morning.  Everything turned out for the good, “and we know all things work together for good to them that love God, and are the called according to His purpose.” (Romans 8:28)  However, that doesn’t mean that it was easy. 

Our walk with our beloved Jesus is often laced with the unexpected.  Sometimes, the unexpected is the result of our mortal enemy’s efforts to cause us to stumble and lose sight of our blessed redeemer.  Other times, the unexpected is the result of life.  Whoever said that the Christian life would be easy, and I have heard it said, that person was a liar.  There is nothing easy about life whether it is the life of a child of God or the life of a sinner.  Life is far from easy, for there are pitfalls all along the way.  It would be so easy if we had a robot who would say, “Danger, danger child of God.”  In reality, we don’t need a robot, rather we just need to listen to the Spirit of God.  He is ever speaking and showing us where those pitfalls are.  I choose to listen to what the Spirit has to say, how about you?

In love with Jesus-OTP